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Michael Jackson’s ‘This Is It’ 2009

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MTV’s 30th Anniversary: Michael Jackson’s impact

Fact: Michael Jackson had a video in the top 5 of each of MTV’s 3 decades;

#1 Thriller – 1980’s, #2 Scream – 1990’s, and #5 You Rock My World – 2000’s.

The 30 Best Music Videos Ever: Billboard Poll Results

By Alan Sepinwall/The Star-Ledger

How big an impact did Michael Jackson have on MTV? Put it this way: it took Jackson’s death to get the channel to start playing music videos again.

For the first day and a half after the death of the King of Pop, MTV largely abandoned its usual lineup of reality shows in favor of a marathon of Jackson videos, from the classics like “Beat It” to more obscure ones like 2001’s “You Rock My World” (with a Marlon Brando cameo!).

It’s been often said that Jackson brought about two fundamental changes to the world of music video: he desegregated MTV, and the cost and scope of his videos marked a paradigm shift away from the cheap, unambitious schlock MTV had been showing to that point.

There’s more evidence supporting the former theory than the latter, but Jackson inarguably made as big a mark in the world of video as he did in the world of music itself.

Great as his songs were, many of our strongest memories of him come from television: The early Jackson 5 appearances with Diana Ross. The Rankin/Bass-produced Saturday morning cartoon. Jackson moonwalking to “Billie Jean” on the Motown 25th anniversary special on CBS in 1983, which has to rank alongside the “Ed Sullivan Show” debuts of Elvis Presley and The Beatles among the most iconic moments in the crossover between music and TV.

Most of all, we think of the videos: of Michael as a dancing zombie in “Thriller,” Michael as a tough gang kid in “Beat It,” Michael evading the paparazzi in “Billie Jean,” etc. As he grew from boy to man, it was his dancing as much as his singing that made him the King of Pop, and nowhere was his otherworldly footwork on better display than in his videos.

MTV executives have always denied that there was any kind of prohibition against African American artists in the channel’s early days, while Walter Yetnikoff, who was the head of Jackson’s record label at the time, has always insisted there was.

Yetnikoff wrote in his autobiography, “Howling at the Moon,” that “I screamed bloody murder when MTV refused to air his videos. They argued that their format, white rock, excluded Michael’s music. I argued they were racist (jerks) — and I’d trumpet it to the world if they didn’t relent… With added pressure from Quincy Jones, they caved in, and in doing so the MTV color line came crashing down.”

Whether MTV’s resistance to Jackson had to do with color or genre, there was no question that his videos quickly became the channel’s biggest draw.

The launch of the video for “Thriller” — a 13-minute pastiche of ’50s horror movies, directed by John Landis and featuring horror legend Vincent Price in a cameo — was presented with all the pomp and circumstance of a movie premiere. Later Jackson videos, notably “Bad” and “Black or White,” got similar treatment.

Whether there had previously been resistance to artists of color on the channel or not, there’s no question that they became more prevalent after Jackson’s ascension.

As for changing the content of the videos themselves, what Jackson and his collaborators accomplished wasn’t so much a matter of kind as of degree. While the reputation of early ’80s MTV was of low-budget videos that were little more than glorified concert footage, many videos of the pre-“Thriller” period were ambitious and/or expensive, like Duran Duran’s “Rio,” or Blondie’s “Rapture.”

But the “Beat It” video cost a reported $150,000, a huge figure at the time. “Thriller” was an epic. Many of Jackson’s videos in later years would debut at an extreme length, then be cut down for regular airplay.

In addition to Landis, Jackson would work with directors like Martin Scorsese (“Bad”), John Singleton (“Remember the Time,” which featured cameos by Eddie Murphy and Magic Johnson), Spike Lee (“They Don’t Care About Us”) and David Fincher (“Who Is It”). (Jackson also got Francis Ford Coppola to direct “Captain EO,” the 3-D movie musical that used to play at Disney’s theme parks.)

And as Jackson put more time, money and artistry into his videos, other singers followed suit.

Alan Sepinwall may be reached at asepinwall@starledger.com, or at 1 Star-Ledger Plaza, Newark, N.J. 07102-1200. Please include your full name and hometown.

NJ.com


ValCom Taps Into Hidden Library Treasure With Michael Jackson’s Last Film

CLEARWATER, Fla., July 27, 2011 /PRNewswire/ — As part of its ongoing strategy to monetize content from its film and audio library, ValCom, Inc. (VLCO.PK) announced today that it will be releasing Michael Jackson’s last movie on Broadcast TV and DVD.

The movie will be broadcast to over 300 television stations this fall through the My Family TV, Retro TV, and TUFF TV television networks. ValCom will be announcing the broadcast date for the movie in the near future. In addition, ValCom will be releasing a special run of 10,000 limited edition DVDs that will be sold directly to the public.

“This is a golden opportunity for ValCom! Michael Jackson is the number-one selling artist of all time with millions of fans around the world,” stated Vince Vellardita, President and CEO of ValCom. “We’re providing the chance for people to own rare and unreleased footage of Michael Jackson behind the scenes and at Neverland Ranch.”

The film is a comedy that spoofs movies and television programs like Miss Congeniality, Planet of the Apes, Cast Away, Love Boat, Gilligan’s Island, The Sixth Sense, Jurassic Park, Men in Black and more. Michael Jackson plays the role of Agent MJ. Jackson’s scenes were shot at his Neverland Ranch home. The DVD includes 20 minutes of unreleased, never before seen Michael Jackson footage, not limited to interviews of the world’s greatest entertainer.

Michael Jackson, one of the most widely beloved entertainers and profoundly influential artists of all time, leaves an indelible imprint on popular music and culture. Five of Jackson’s solo albums – “Off the Wall,” “Thriller,” “Bad,” “Dangerous” and “HIStory,” are among the top sellers of all time, and “Thriller” holds the distinction as the largest selling album worldwide in the history of the recording industry with more than 70 million units sold. Additionally, singles released from the “Thriller” album sold more than 100 million copies worldwide, another all time record.

During his extraordinary career, he sold an estimated 750 million records worldwide, released 13 No. 1 singles and became one of a handful of artists to be inducted twice into the Rock and Roll Hall of Fame. The Guinness Book of World Records recognized Jackson as the Most Successful Entertainer of All Time and “Thriller” as the Biggest Selling Album of All Time. Jackson won 13 Grammy Awards and received the American Music Award’s Artist of the Century Award.

About ValCom, Inc.

Based in Clearwater, FL, ValCom, Inc. is a diversified, fully integrated, independent entertainment company that has been in operation since 1983. ValCom, Inc., through its operating divisions and subsidiaries, creates and operates full service facilities that accommodate film, television and commercial productions with its four divisions comprised of television and film production, broadcasting (My Family TV Network), distribution, and live theatre. ValCom’s client list consists of all of the majors such as MGM, Paramount Pictures, Warner Bros, Disney, CBS, Sony, NBC, Universal Studios, Phantom of the Opera, HSN, and more. For more information, please visit the company’s website at www.valcom.tv

Note About Forward-Looking Statements

With the exception of historical information, this press release may contain forward-looking statements as that are made pursuant to the “safe harbor” provisions as defined within The Private Securities Litigation Reform Act of 1995 (the “PSLRA”). Forward-looking statements may be identified by words including “anticipates,” “believes,” “intends,” “estimates,” and similar expressions. In addition, any other statements which contain characterizations of future events or circumstances are forward-looking statements. These statements are based upon management’s current expectations as of the date of this press release. Actual results may differ materially from the expectations contained in this press release due to a number of risks and uncertainties relating to our business which are discussed in detail in the Company’s periodic filings with the Securities and Exchange Commission. ValCom, Inc. does not undertake any responsibility to publicly update any forward-looking statements to reflect events or circumstances after the date on which any such statement is made or to reflect the occurrence of unanticipated events.

Investor Relations:
Ingrid Clavijo
727-953-9778

SOURCE ValCom, Inc.

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